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Writers' News

AAR Becomes AALA

locusmag.com – Sunday January 10, 2021

The Association of Au­thors’ Representatives (the professional organiza­tion for literary agents) has changed its name to the Association of American Literary Agents. They say the new name “better reflects the membership and aligns the organization with its core mission of empowering and educating literary agents.”

[Read the full article]

Marian Keyes to help budding writers unlock their talents

independent.ie – Sunday January 10, 2021

She has written 15 best-selling novels and sold 35 million books worldwide and now Marian Keyes wants to share her wisdom with aspiring writers.

The Irish author says she has been moved to teach others a way they can escape through writing now that life has been become so "brutal" under lockdown.

[Read the full article]

Authors Seek Missing Payments from Shuttered Literary Agency

publishersweekly.com – Friday January 8, 2021

When the former cofounders of Foundry Literary + Media parted ways in September to launch their own literary agencies, the partners said that thousands of existing contracts would still be handled by Foundry. It appears that payments to some authors with contracts residing at Foundry have been stalled.

According to multiple sources, a number of authors have either not been paid royalties owed, or have had checks for those royalties bounce. Sources also indicated that some former agents of the firm may also be owed money.

[Read the full article]

Museum seeks submissions for Waterston Desert Writing Prize, student essays

ktvz.com – Thursday January 7, 2021

The High Desert Museum is now accepting submissions for the 2021 Waterston Desert Writing Prize. 

The Prize honors literary nonfiction that illustrates artistic excellence, sensitivity to place, and desert literacy with the desert as both subject and setting. Emerging, mid-career and established nonfiction writers are invited to apply.

To learn more about the Waterston Desert Writing Prize and how to submit an entry, visit highdesertmuseum.org/waterston-prize. Submissions will be accepted through May 1, 2021.

Inspired by author and poet Ellen Waterston’s love of the High Desert, a region that has been her muse for more than 30 years, the Prize launched in 2014 and annually recognizes the vital role deserts play worldwide in the ecosystem and human narrative. The Prize is named in honor of actor Sam Waterston, who provided the seed money for the endowment that helps fund the award.

[Read the full article]

Publishers Association in the UK are happy with Brexit Deal

goodereader.com – Tuesday January 5, 2021

With a trade deal between the UK and EU finally, in place, the Publishers Association in the UK has heaved a sigh of relief as this will ensure uninterrupted trade with the European Union. The UK government and the European Union had time till December 31, 2020, to finalize the terms of the new relationship between them as the transition period comes to an end.

[Read the full article]

Announcing the Winner of the 2020 QueryLetter.com Writing Contest

queryletter.com – Sunday January 3, 2021

We at QueryLetter.com love a good blurb that compels us to read the book. Capturing people’s attention in as few words as possible is the name of the game.

A few months ago, we launched a writing contest that is all about book blurbs. The basis of the competition is simple: Write a blurb about a completely made-up, nonexistent book that would make people want to read the story. The person with the best blurb would win $500.

[Read the full article]

A Mysterious Phishing Scam Is Roiling the Publishing Industry

theattic.jezebel.com – Tuesday December 22, 2020

The publishing industry has become the target of an international phishing scam, according to the New York Times. What usually happens is this: The author of a book will receive an email that appears to have been sent by their agent or editor, requesting the most recent draft of their manuscript. Not suspecting anything out of the ordinary, the authors attach the document, and then...nothing. They later realize that the person to whom they replied was not their agent or editor, but never do they learn what has happened to their manuscript. The manuscripts don’t seem to end up anywhere on the internet, and no one ever gets in touch with the writer or publishing house to demand a ransom or anything of the sort.

[Read the full article]

Announcing the 2021 National Magazine Awards Categories & Call for Entries

newswire.ca – Tuesday December 22, 2020

TORONTO, Dec. 21, 2020 /CNW/ - The National Media Awards Foundation is thrilled to announce the call for entries and to unveil the lineup of categories for the 44th annual National Magazine Awards. The lineup includes 29 categories and two special, prestigious awards: Magazine Grand Prix and the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement.

The Foundation is also pleased to introduce an exciting, cross-programming initiative. National Magazine Awards participants are invited to submit their work to a series of seven unique categories, and these entries will compete among those submitted to the Digital Publishing Awards (DPA) and National Magazine Awards: B2B (NMA) programs. A single panel of judges will evaluate all entries, with winners announced across all three programs.

[Read the full article]

Julie Burchill's publisher cancels book contract over Islam tweets

theguardian.com – Wednesday December 16, 2020

The journalist Julie Burchill has had a book contract cancelled after her publisher said she “crossed a line” with her Islamophobic comments on Twitter.

Burchill’s publisher, the Hachette imprint Little, Brown, said it had decided not to publish Welcome to the Woke Trials because she had used indefensible language when communicating with the journalist Ash Sarkar.

[Read the full article]

'It’s been a rollercoaster': how indie publishers survived - and thrived - in 2020

theguardian.com – Wednesday December 16, 2020

Six months ago, independent publishers Jacaranda and Knights Of were warning publicly that their income had fallen to almost zero. They weren’t the only small publishers struggling. With bookshops and distributors closing, a survey from the Bookseller at the time found that almost 60% of small publishers feared closure by the autumn. No bookshops meant no knowledgeable, passionate booksellers pressing new books they loved on to customers; no events and no travel meant that crucial avenues for introducing new writers had disappeared.

The stars had been looking very happily aligned for Oneworld in March. The independent publisher had three of its biggest books scheduled for the month – a novel from Women’s prize winner Tayari Jones, Silver Sparrow; a new thriller from the bestselling crime author Will Dean, Black River; and Damien Love’s novel for older children, Monstrous Devices. It had printed point-of-sale materials, invested in marketing, advertising, printing.

Then came the first national lockdown. “Silver Sparrow came out on the Thursday and then on the Monday the bookshops shut,” says Juliet Mabey, the publisher whose impeccable taste saw Oneworld win two Booker prizes in a row with novels from Marlon James and Paul Beatty. “It was incredibly frustrating and stressful.”

[Read the full article]

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