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Writers' News

'NYT' Says HC, PRH Top Contenders to Buy S&S

publishersweekly.com – Wednesday November 18, 2020

In New York Times story this morning, the paper reported that the country’s two largest trade book publishers are the leading candidates to buy the country’s third largest trade publisher. HarperCollins and Penguin Random House are favored, and were cited as such after private equity firms reportedly dropped out of the bidding.

Several international publishers had been thought to be looking at S&S as well, with France's Vivendi believed to still have interest.

[Read the full article]

UK book sales down 11% for first half

booksandpublishing.com.au – Monday November 16, 2020

In the UK, stats from the Publishers Association (PA) show that total book sales across the industry fell 11% in the first six months of the year, reports the Bookseller.

According to the PA, the total invoiced value of sales from UK publishers in all formats (including exports) was £1.5 billion (A$2.72b), down from £1.7 billion (A$3.1b) in the first half of 2019. Total sales for the UK market alone were down 6% to £837 million (A$1.51b), while exports fell 17% to £653 million (A$1.18b).

A big increase in fiction titles (up 13%), and a surge in sales of ebooks (up 26%) and audiobooks (up 47%), were outweighed by a 17% drop in print books, led by steep falls in the educational and professional sector.

[Read the full article]

Pandemic drives ebook and audiobook sales by UK publishers to all-time high

theguardian.com – Saturday November 14, 2020

Sales of digital books by British publishers are set to hit an all-time high this year as the public turns to reading to escape pandemic cabin fever.

However, the ebook and audiobook boom comes at a high cost for the industry, with global sales of printed books by UK publishers plunging by 55m in the first six months of the year as high streets and schools closed during the first coronavirus lockdown.

The pandemic has revived the fortunes of the consumer ebook. The format once touted as the future of reading has suffered six straight years of sales declines since peaking in 2014 but this year has been different, with sales home and abroad up 17% to £144m in the first half. UK publishers can now expect consumer ebooks to enjoy their best year since 2015, when sales were just under £300m.

[Read the full article]

Alumna launches magazine as ‘safe space’ for writers

temple-news.com – Thursday November 12, 2020

After losing her fiancé to suicide, Jenna Faccenda began wrestling with her life’s purpose.

“Those deep thoughts and how my footprint on this Earth could really be impactful toward someone else,” Faccenda said. 

Amid her grief, Faccenda, a 2017 journalism alumna, turned back to her love of writing and ventured to create a community for other artists experiencing trauma. She launched Eclipse Lit, a literature magazine for writers to discuss trauma and heal through their artwork. 

With writer submissions open from Oct. 1 through Nov. 15, Faccenda intends to publish her first edition, a collection of short stories, essays and multimedia art from artists around Philadelphia, in March 2021.

[Read the full article]

Midwest Writers Workshop goes virtual

kpcnews.com – Thursday November 12, 2020

This year Midwest Writers Workshop Inc. has designed an online version of MWW Agent Fest, Wednesday to Saturday, Nov. 18-21. The conference offers opportunities for fiction and nonfiction writers to pitch to literary agents, learn about the business of writing and publishing, network and enjoy the writing community that makes MWW so special.

Here’s a chance for writers to pitch their book ideas directly to literary agents in search of new voices. Writers can connect with literary agents who are actively searching for the next big thing across all genres including fiction, nonfiction, young adult and more. During the Agent Fest Online 2020, writers have an opportunity to meet agents one-on-one via Zoom and capture their attention with the basic concept of their book.

[Read the full article]

Myth and folklore the pick of festive trends in children's

thebookseller.com – Monday November 9, 2020

Children’s books about Christmas, mythology and adventures are among the top titles available from small independent publishers this autumn.

Despite lockdown and an uncertain retail market, many of the smaller children’s publishers are hoping for a boost in sales with their festive titles, which include The Girl Who Stole the Stars by Corrina Campbell, published by Little Door Book, and Leah’s Star by Margaret Bateson Hill (Alanna Max), which tells the nativity story from the point of view of the innkeeper’s daughter. The Salariya Book Company has two Christmas-themed books out this autumn: Little Bear and the Silver Star by Jane Hissey, and Billy and the Balloons by Elizabeth Dale and Patrick Corrigan.

[Read the full article]

Print Unit Sales Rose 9.5% At the End of October

publishersweekly.com – Sunday November 8, 2020

With sales up in all categories, unit sales of print books rose 9.5% in the week ended Oct. 31, 2020, over the comparable week in 2019, at outlets that report to NPD BookScan. The top-selling book was The Deep End (Diary of a Wimpy Kid #15) by Jeff Kinney, which sold more than 171,000 copies and helped to drive up sales in the juvenile fiction category by 15.5%.

[Read the full article]

Bookshop.org is what the publishing world has been waiting for

theguardian.com – Thursday November 5, 2020

In publishing we often talk about things that we are “excited” and “delighted” about, so much that sometimes I think the words have lost their meanings. However, when readers, publishers and independent bookshops shared their delight about the new books retail platform, Bookshop.org, launched on Monday, it was the result of some of the most exciting news we’ve had in publishing for aeons.

Following its success in the US, Bookshop.org has arrived in the UK and promises something we have all been asking for – an ethical and transparent platform for buying books that amplifies the uniqueness of independent bookshops, with reading lists curated by humans rather than algorithms.

[Read the full article]

Bloody Scotland: Virtual Scots crime writing festival goes global on its debut

sundaypost.com – Sunday November 1, 2020

The Bloody Scotland festival, usually held in Stirling, featured leading authors including Ian Rankin, Val McDermid, Ann Cleeves, Chris Brookmyre and Lee Child.

Organisers confirmed the three-day virtual festival attracted nearly three times the record 10,000 who attended in person in 2019.

The event also “went global”, with authors discussing their work in five continents and audiences logging in from more than 20 countries around the world.

Bob McDevitt, Bloody Scotland’s director, said the success of this year’s virtual festival had inspired a rethink of the traditional format to combine live and online content in future.

[Read the full article]

Novel-writing challenge offers 30 days to go ‘dancing’ with words

pe.com – Sunday November 1, 2020

According to its website, “NaNoWriMo tracks words for writers like FitBit tracks steps.”

NaNoWriMo is a worldwide nonprofit organization that offers support for writing goals. It’s name is short for National Novel Writing Month. Since 1999 thousands of novelists have challenged themselves to write an astounding 50,000 words in the 30 days of November.

NaNoWriMo serves as a “social network with author profiles, personal project libraries, and writing buddies.” During November, they send periodic pep talks. This year, you can expect motivation from authors Elizabeth Acevedo, Charlie Jane Anders, Kacen Callender and Alexis Daria. (If you are a writer of YA novels and are not familiar with Elizabeth Acevedo, check out my post on her novel in verse “The Poet X” at VictoriaWaddle.com. It’s very exciting that she is giving a pep talk this year. She’s a perfect choice.)

You might think there’s no way you can get any writing done this month, not in 2020. I understand this feeling. Yet, I’ve always found the time I least wanted a goal was when I most needed one. Consider also that readers are looking for conflict. No conflict, no story. And if you aren’t conflicted right now, you are living in an alternate universe. Since the goal of NaNoWriMo is to write as much as you can, why not try putting that conflict on the page? No editing, no revision, not yet. Just pour it out. It might be great therapy and ease some of your stress. And it will likely be the genesis of a future work.

[Read the full article]

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